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  1. Why Do Dogs Have Wet Noses?

    fabulous dog bed company wet nose

     

    You're sitting quietly on the couch when you feel a cold, wet nose nuzzling your face or hand. Your dog is trying to tell you something, but you don't know what it wants. All you know is that his nose feels like an Antarctic snow storm — a sign of good health — or so you've been taught. Frankly, whether a dog has a wet nose is not a signal, one way or another, of good health. It's an old wives' tale that has no basis in fact.

    So, why are dogs' noses sometimes dry and sometimes wet? No one knows for sure, but there are myriad theories. One suggests that because dogs are always licking their noses, their salvia helps paint their snoz with mucus produced in the nostrils. As a result, all that mucus-licking improves a dog's ability to smell things.

     

    fabulous luxury dog pet beds wet nose westie

    How does that work? When dogs sniff the air — they are always sniffing the air — they inhale tiny suspended particles. These particles get trapped in their nasal mucus, which helps the dog figure out what they are smelling. As a dog licks his or her nose, it picks up some of the scent-laden goop. The tongue then brushes against an olfactory gland on the roof of the mouth, which helps our four-legged companions figure out what they are exactly smelling.

    Another reason, some have suggested, is that a wet nose helps keep a dog cool in warm weather. When we humans sweat, the perspiration our sweat glands produce evaporates, cooling us down. Dogs, however, do not sweat. That's because they have no sweat glands, except on the bottom of their paw pads. Instead they pant to cool off.

    However, a dog's nose, unlike the rest of its body, is not covered in fur. It also brims with blood vessels. When a dog licks its nose, the theory suggests, it is cooling itself down as saliva, like human sweat, evaporates. That leaves the surface area of the nose cool, along with the blood circulating in and around Fido's snout. Consequently, cooler blood flows through the dog's body, keeping our best friends a bit cooler.

    Still, why are dogs noses often dry? For one thing, they might not be licking it much. Touch your dog's nose in the morning. Chances are, it'll be as dry as the Sahara. That's because as a dog sleeps, it rarely licks its nose. Certain breeds, like bulldogs and pugs, also have noses that are mostly dry. Age also tends to make a nose dry.

    fabulous dog dog beds wet nose pooch

    The bottom line is that if your dog has a dry nose, chill out. The dog isn't sick. Wait a few hours and it will be wet again.

  2. How do I know if my dog is in pain?

    fabulous dog beds sick pooch

     

    1. Antisocial or aggressive behaviour

    Dogs might stop running to greet you at the door, try to avoid contact, or even become aggressive. If your dog is hiding away or appears to be unusually antisocial, it could be an indication that they’re in pain. Any noticeable change in behaviour can be cause for concern.

    2. Changes in eating, drinking, and sleeping habits

    Dogs that are in pain often sleep more – they may be trying to heal, or it might even be difficult for them to move around and be active. A loss of appetite and noticeable differences in the amount of water they’re drinking are often common symptoms. Difficulty eating, particularly dried food or firm chews, can indicate dental pain.

    3. Being more vocal

    Dogs that are experiencing pain tend to be more vocal. Excessive yelping, growling, snarling, and even howling could be your dog telling you that something isn’t right.

    luxury fabulous dog beds sick dog

    4. Excessive grooming

    If your pet is licking their paws constantly, it’s likely they’re trying to soothe themselves. When a dog is hurt, its first instinct is often to clean and care for the wound by licking it. Cuts are more obvious, however, sometimes the pain can be internal.

    5. Heavy panting or altered breathing

    Panting is normal. However, a dog that is panting heavily even though they have not been exercising is a warning sign. Also, breathing that is more shallow means that it could be painful to take a breath.

    fabulous dog pet beds uk unwell doggie

     

    6. Mobility issues

    Stiffness and limping are two of the more obvious signs of pain in dogs and are likely a result of injury, sore paws, or even arthritis. Your dog might be reluctant to climb stairs or is noticeably slow when getting up. This can also manifest itself as reduced interest in exercise, or not being as active as usual.

    7. Signs of agitation

    Restlessness is an indicator of pain in dogs. If your dog is pacing back and forth repeatedly, difficulty getting comfortable, or is sleeping a lot less, there could be an underlying issue.

    8. Changes in their body and posture

    Swelling of the paws, legs, and face is a sign of pain that could be caused by inflammation, infection or even cancer. When in pain, some dogs have a very rigid and hunched stance while others assume the ‘prayer’ posture with their front legs on the ground and their bottom in the air. Dogs often take the ‘prayer’ position when they are suffering from abdominal pain as it allows them to stretch this area out.

    9. Shaking or trembling

    Don’t assume trembling or shaking is just your dog feeling cold or, indeed, getting old. Both can be a sign of pain — or a symptom of something more serious such as poisoning, pancreatitis, or kidney disease. Dogs who have swallowed large amounts of chocolate, mouldy compost or sugar-free sweetener xylitol, for example, often suffer severe muscle tremors.

  3. fabulous dog beds happy pooch

     

    10 Signs Your Dog Is Happy

    1. His eyes and eyelids are relaxed, he blinks a lot, his gaze is soft and his brow is smooth. His ears are also relaxed, not cocked or pointing. His mouth is open a bit with a few teeth visible (but not bared), his tongue may be lolling and he may even appear to be smiling.
    2. She's holding her body in a relaxed posture versus a tense or stiff stance. She's holding her tail high and wagging it with such gusto her whole body is wiggling. Alternatively, her tail may be in a more neutral position, with a softer, slower wag.
    3. He has no destructive behaviors, even when he's home alone. Happy dogs generally get plenty of physical and mental stimulation. Bored, under-exercised, under-stimulated dogs are more likely to become destructive, along with dogs who suffer from separation anxiety.
    4. She loves to play. Happy dogs are always up for a game or a walk or a ride in the car. Since exercise and play are so natural for dogs, if your canine companion doesn't seem interested, she may be dealing with some pain or an illness, and it's time to make an appointment with your veterinarian.
    5. He's belly-up and tongue out. Happy dogs tend to show their bellies and tongues as they wriggle around on their backs. Happy belly displays are different from submissive belly rolls in which the dog's mouth is usually closed and his body is stiff.
    6. Her appetite is good, which indicates she's both happy and feeling physically well. A noticeable decrease (or increase) in your pet's appetite can be a symptom of an underlying condition.
    7. He's happy barking. Some dogs rarely bark, but those who do tend to have a higher-pitched bark when they're happy that usually doesn't last long.
    8. She play bows. Many happy dogs raise their backsides in the air and lower their chests to the ground as an invitation to play with either their favorite human or a doggy friend.
    9. He leans into you. A happy dog will often lean into your hand when you pet him, and lean into or keep contact with your body whenever the opportunity presents itself.
    10. She's thrilled to see you. Happy dogs are without fail excited to see their human come through the door, even if said human has only stepped outside for a minute to check the weather!

    luxury dog beds happy doggie

     

  4. Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

    fabulous pet dog beds made in uk grass dog piccopy

    One of the most common questions that many pet parents ask me is, "why do dogs eat grass?" In the video above, I shed some light on the motives behind this popular doggy behavior. I urge you to read this article as well to know the reasons why dogs are prone to this unusual habit.

    luxury fabulous dog pet beds grass doggies

    Grass-Eating Is a Common Occurrence in Dogs

    Many dog owners usually feel alarmed whenever they see their beloved Fido chewing on their lawn. But the truth is that grass-eating, a behavior technically known as "pica," or eating things that are not characterized as food, is quite common among dogs. Even wild dogs have been found to do this.

    In puppies and younger dogs, grass eating may be a sign of boredom or playful behavior. However, there are certain health-related reasons why some pets are prone to this – but they do it mainly to purge their system.

    •Dogs eat grass when they suffer from gastrointestinal upset. Most of you are well aware that dogs will, on occasion, eat large amounts of grass in an attempt to make themselves throw up. When they exhibit this behavior, it tends to be almost frantic.

    They'll whimper and cry to be let out, then they'll run outside and start eating any grass they can find; they're not selective.

    After they consume a large amount of grass, they'll often times lick their lips because they're nauseous, and then of course, they'll vomit. It's completely normal for your dog to vomit occasionally (like people do when they are ill), meaning one or two times a year.

    Most often it's nothing to worry about and, surprising as this may sound, your dog knows what's best in terms of intentionally voiding their system of something that could be toxic, or making them unwell.

    fabulous dog beds handmade doggie grass

    •It could be a way of easing nausea, gas or bloating. Again, these conditions are related to gastrointestinal upset.

    •They may be suffering from intestinal worms. A study1 conducted in wild chimpanzees suggested that they consumed plant material to increase intestinal motility and help them eliminate intestinal parasites – the same may be said for canines.

    •Dogs may eat grass to fulfill a nutritional requirement. One study tells the story of a miniature poodle that ate grass and then vomited every day, for seven years. After placing the dog on a high-fiber diet, the dog stopped eating grass entirely.2

    •It is a trait that they inherited from their ancestors. Some people believe that because wild dogs ingested prey that had plant matter in their bowels, present-day canines seek it as well.3

    •They enjoy it! Some dogs consider it a fun and rewarding behavior, and may eat grass simply to pass time (more on this later).

     

    luxury handmade fabulous dog beds grass pooch

    What to Do if Your Dog Eats Grass Often

    As I said earlier, many dogs will eat grass to make themselves vomit, but if your dog is doing this on a frequent basis it's a sign that her system may be off kilter.

    In this case, you absolutely need to reevaluate their diet, as frequent gastrointestinal upset is a sign that something is wrong with the food that you're feeding.

    It may be a great quality food, one your dog has been eating for years with no trouble. But if your dog begins vomiting up grass and food several times a week or even weekly, I can tell you that this is not normal.

    I would recommend switching brands of food, switching flavors and switching protein sources. Above all, if you're capable of going from an entirely dead diet (kibble or canned) to an entirely living diet (raw), that would be wonderful!

    You may want to seek the help of a holistic veterinarian who can help you to switch your dog to a new diet. Most importantly, if your dog has been eating the same diet for most of his life, you will need to make the transition gradually.

    The other items that you should consider adding to your dog's food are probiotics and digestive enzymes. Probiotics help reseed and fortify the beneficial bacteria in your dog's gut, while the digestive enzymes provide what the entrails or the guts of their prey species would have.

    These enzymes provide a rich source of amylase, lipase and protease, which can help your pets process food much more successfully.

    So, that's one scenario -- the obsessive consumption of a large amount of grass in order to produce an episode of purging or vomiting. The next reason is entirely different …

    Dogs May Feed on Grass Simply Because They Want To

    Contrast the first scenario -- your dog rushing out and eating any and all grass in sight -- with this second scenario: you let your dog out the back door. It looks like he's having a great time running around when all of a sudden you see him on a mission. He is sniffing and specifically seeking out tall, broad grasses -- the tall grasses that typically grow along a fence line or up from sidewalk cracks.

    Your dog is very selectively picking out certain grasses. He identifies them and uses his front teeth to nibble and eat them. He's not frantic, he is doing it almost with intention and you see him select a few grasses and go about his way.

    That's an entirely different scenario and that's scenario number two, which means your dog is eating grass because he wants to.

    Eating Grass Is a Normal Dog Behavior

    Dogs know what they need to consume. And in fact, biologists have told us that all canids -- dogs and wild dogs (wolves, coyotes, dingoes, etc.) -- consume grass and it's a completely normal behavior.

    So it's important to recognize that you don't have to prevent your dogs from eating grass unless you have treated grass or your grass has pesticides, herbicides, and chemicals on it.

    It's obviously important that you don't allow your dogs to consume toxins when they're consuming those grasses, but if the grass is free from contaminants, you can let your dog eat away.

    Grass Has Nutrients Your Dog May Need

    The grasses your dog is seeking out probably contains some nutritional value that your dog is seeking. We know that grass contains an abundant source of fiber or roughage, for instance, and we know that since grass is a living green food it contains phytonutrients and is high in potassium and also chlorophyll. Grasses are also a pretty good source of digestive enzymes.

    So your dog could be seeking out selective grasses to make up for one of these nutritional components that they're currently not getting in their diet.

    Some dogs may also eat grass because they are under-fed, don't have access to adequate food or are just plain bored. But, in the vast majority of cases, even if your dog is well fed and well cared for, he will still selectively pick out certain grasses just for their nutritional health benefits.

     

  5. Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

    fabulous pet dog beds made in uk grass dog piccopy

    One of the most common questions that many pet parents ask me is, "why do dogs eat grass?" In the video above, I shed some light on the motives behind this popular doggy behavior. I urge you to read this article as well to know the reasons why dogs are prone to this unusual habit.

    luxury fabulous dog pet beds grass doggies

    Grass-Eating Is a Common Occurrence in Dogs

    Many dog owners usually feel alarmed whenever they see their beloved Fido chewing on their lawn. But the truth is that grass-eating, a behavior technically known as "pica," or eating things that are not characterized as food, is quite common among dogs. Even wild dogs have been found to do this.

    In puppies and younger dogs, grass eating may be a sign of boredom or playful behavior. However, there are certain health-related reasons why some pets are prone to this – but they do it mainly to purge their system.

    •Dogs eat grass when they suffer from gastrointestinal upset. Most of you are well aware that dogs will, on occasion, eat large amounts of grass in an attempt to make themselves throw up. When they exhibit this behavior, it tends to be almost frantic.

    They'll whimper and cry to be let out, then they'll run outside and start eating any grass they can find; they're not selective.

    After they consume a large amount of grass, they'll often times lick their lips because they're nauseous, and then of course, they'll vomit. It's completely normal for your dog to vomit occasionally (like people do when they are ill), meaning one or two times a year.

    Most often it's nothing to worry about and, surprising as this may sound, your dog knows what's best in terms of intentionally voiding their system of something that could be toxic, or making them unwell.

    fabulous dog beds handmade doggie grass

    •It could be a way of easing nausea, gas or bloating. Again, these conditions are related to gastrointestinal upset.

    •They may be suffering from intestinal worms. A study1 conducted in wild chimpanzees suggested that they consumed plant material to increase intestinal motility and help them eliminate intestinal parasites – the same may be said for canines.

    •Dogs may eat grass to fulfill a nutritional requirement. One study tells the story of a miniature poodle that ate grass and then vomited every day, for seven years. After placing the dog on a high-fiber diet, the dog stopped eating grass entirely.2

    •It is a trait that they inherited from their ancestors. Some people believe that because wild dogs ingested prey that had plant matter in their bowels, present-day canines seek it as well.3

    •They enjoy it! Some dogs consider it a fun and rewarding behavior, and may eat grass simply to pass time (more on this later).

     

    luxury handmade fabulous dog beds grass pooch

    What to Do if Your Dog Eats Grass Often

    As I said earlier, many dogs will eat grass to make themselves vomit, but if your dog is doing this on a frequent basis it's a sign that her system may be off kilter.

    In this case, you absolutely need to reevaluate their diet, as frequent gastrointestinal upset is a sign that something is wrong with the food that you're feeding.

    It may be a great quality food, one your dog has been eating for years with no trouble. But if your dog begins vomiting up grass and food several times a week or even weekly, I can tell you that this is not normal.

    I would recommend switching brands of food, switching flavors and switching protein sources. Above all, if you're capable of going from an entirely dead diet (kibble or canned) to an entirely living diet (raw), that would be wonderful!

    You may want to seek the help of a holistic veterinarian who can help you to switch your dog to a new diet. Most importantly, if your dog has been eating the same diet for most of his life, you will need to make the transition gradually.

    The other items that you should consider adding to your dog's food are probiotics and digestive enzymes. Probiotics help reseed and fortify the beneficial bacteria in your dog's gut, while the digestive enzymes provide what the entrails or the guts of their prey species would have.

    These enzymes provide a rich source of amylase, lipase and protease, which can help your pets process food much more successfully.

    So, that's one scenario -- the obsessive consumption of a large amount of grass in order to produce an episode of purging or vomiting. The next reason is entirely different …

    Dogs May Feed on Grass Simply Because They Want To

    Contrast the first scenario -- your dog rushing out and eating any and all grass in sight -- with this second scenario: you let your dog out the back door. It looks like he's having a great time running around when all of a sudden you see him on a mission. He is sniffing and specifically seeking out tall, broad grasses -- the tall grasses that typically grow along a fence line or up from sidewalk cracks.

    Your dog is very selectively picking out certain grasses. He identifies them and uses his front teeth to nibble and eat them. He's not frantic, he is doing it almost with intention and you see him select a few grasses and go about his way.

    That's an entirely different scenario and that's scenario number two, which means your dog is eating grass because he wants to.

    Eating Grass Is a Normal Dog Behavior

    Dogs know what they need to consume. And in fact, biologists have told us that all canids -- dogs and wild dogs (wolves, coyotes, dingoes, etc.) -- consume grass and it's a completely normal behavior.

    So it's important to recognize that you don't have to prevent your dogs from eating grass unless you have treated grass or your grass has pesticides, herbicides, and chemicals on it.

    It's obviously important that you don't allow your dogs to consume toxins when they're consuming those grasses, but if the grass is free from contaminants, you can let your dog eat away.

    Grass Has Nutrients Your Dog May Need

    The grasses your dog is seeking out probably contains some nutritional value that your dog is seeking. We know that grass contains an abundant source of fiber or roughage, for instance, and we know that since grass is a living green food it contains phytonutrients and is high in potassium and also chlorophyll. Grasses are also a pretty good source of digestive enzymes.

    So your dog could be seeking out selective grasses to make up for one of these nutritional components that they're currently not getting in their diet.

    Some dogs may also eat grass because they are under-fed, don't have access to adequate food or are just plain bored. But, in the vast majority of cases, even if your dog is well fed and well cared for, he will still selectively pick out certain grasses just for their nutritional health benefits.